Payless Shoesource Closing 2,300 Stores

Payless ShoeSource has plans to close all stores.

Payless ShoeSource to close all 2,300 stores

Payless ShoeSource plans to close all of its roughly 2,300 stores when it files for bankruptcy later this month, according to media reports.

Sources close to the matter told Reuters that Payless has been unsuccessful in finding a buyer and is preparing to run going-out-of business sales next week.

 

This would be Payless’s second bankruptcy filing, after emerging from an April 2017 filing about 18 months ago.

A string of bankruptcies have already claimed thousands of U.S. stores this year, including some GAP, Gymboree, Things Remembered and Crazy 8 stores. Last year some high-profile businesses like Toys “R” Us, Sears and Bon-Ton —parent of Elder-Beerman — closed thousands of stores after filing for bankruptcy.

There are Payless locations in the Dayton Mall, Mall at Fairfield Commons, Sugar Creek Plaza, Midpointe Center in Middletown, on Salem Avenue in Dayton, at Bechtle Crossing in Springfield, on Voice of America Drive in West Chester, Bridgewater Falls in Hamilton and others in the Cincinnati area.

There is also a distribution center that employs 550 people in Brookville.

Monticello White Bean Soup

What Thomas Jefferson Ate – White Bean Soup

Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States, has a firmly rooted role in American food history. A naturally curious and creative individual, Jefferson embraced the relationship between garden and table. His Virginia plantation Monticello was a place of horticultural creativity and ingenuity; his gardens were home to a number of unique (what would now be considered heirloom) vegetables and fruits. As Minister to France, Jefferson learned a great deal about French cuisine and cooking methods, often recording recipes in his own hand. While in Washington, he became know for throwing the finest dinners the President’s House had ever seen. Jefferson’s Monticello kitchen blended Southern Virginian cooking styles with Continental cuisine, while also incorporating the African cooking influences of his enslaved staff. He had an important impact on the national culinary consciousness, combining food traditions from the Old World and the New World to create a uniquely American approach to cooking.

 

What Thomas Jefferson Ate: White Bean Soup - Learn a colonial recipe from Thomas Jefferson's family at Monticello for White Bean Soup. Vegetarian, healthy, delicious historical recipe.Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale, 1800. Courtesy of the White House Historical Association

While living at Monticello, Jefferson kept a detailed notebook about his kitchen garden, recording the planting of hundreds of varieties of fruits, vegetables, and herbs. He was always in search of new additions to his garden collection. He planted all kinds of things, from Italian grapes to French tarragon to Texas peppers to Irish wheat. He was known to admire Continental gardening styles, and used the book “Observations on Modern Gardening” by British author Thomas Whaley as a resource when planning his own gardens at Monticello. Jefferson was drawn to Whaley’s description of the ferme ornée (ornamental farm) concept, a style of garden that combined the agricultural working farm with the beauty of a pleasure garden. The style is reflected in the ornamental yet functional design of the gardens surrounding Monticello. The records he kept of the various vegetables and fruits he planted have proven extremely helpful to food historians, providing insight into the burgeoning culinary identity of the newly formed American colonies.

image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-Gardens-Jefferson.jpg

What Thomas Jefferson Ate: White Bean Soup - Learn a colonial recipe from Thomas Jefferson's family at Monticello for White Bean Soup. Vegetarian, healthy, delicious historical recipe.The gardens at Monticello

Jefferson was intellectually curious about many subjects, and food was clearly a particular passion. He recorded at least 10 recipes by hand, including a classical French cooking practice which he titled, simply, “Observations on Soup”:

Always observe to lay your meat in the bottom of the pan with a lump of fresh butter. Cut the herbs and roots small and lay them over the meat. Cover it close and put it over a slow fire. This will draw forth the flavors of the herbs and in a much greater degree than to put on the water at first. When the gravy produced from the meat is beginning to dry put in the water, and when the soup is done take it off. Let it cool and skim off the fat clear. Heat it again and dish it up. When you make white soups never put in the cream until you take it off the fire.

Jefferson was appointed Minister (plenipotentiary) to France from 1785 to 1789. While in Europe, he spent a good deal of time exploring French cuisine and cooking methods. He became an expert on French wines, and he even brought a slave from Monticello named James Hemings with him to learn French cookery. When Jefferson took the Oath of Office in 1801, one of his first priorities was finding a suitable French chef for the President’s House kitchen. During Jefferson’s time, and for several decades after, French food, serving styles and social graces were considered the ultimate in refinement. We can still see this fondness for French food styles in America today.

image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Jeffersons-House-in-Paris.jpg

What Thomas Jefferson Ate: White Bean Soup - Learn a colonial recipe from Thomas Jefferson's family at Monticello for White Bean Soup. Vegetarian, healthy, delicious historical recipe.Jefferson’s House in Paris, courtesy of the University of Virginia.

The French-inspired recipe for White Bean Soup in today’s blog appears in a Monticello cooking manuscript compiled by Jefferson’s granddaughters, Virginia Randolph Trist and Septimia Anne Randolph Meikleham. In their notes, they write that the recipe was brought over by their uncle, Gouverneur Morris, from one of his trips to Europe. It is a simple and classic white bean soup, pureed and served over warm grilled bread croutons. The dish is vegetarian; it makes a delicious and healthy winter meal. At Monticello, it would have been served as one of several appetizers in a multi-course meal. Thomas Jefferson was known to have a fondness for vegetables and kept meat consumption to a minimum—in his words, “I have lived temperately, eating little animal food, and that is not an aliment, so much as a condiment for the vegetables which constitute my principal diet.” This soup is a great example of a meat-free dish that surely made an appearance on Thomas Jefferson’s dinner table.

I first read this recipe in the book “Dining at Monticello,” a beautiful hardback volume (now out of print) that combines scholarly essays, illustrations, and recipes to give a broad overview of what food was like at Jefferson’s colonial-era Monticello. I have not yet been able to obtain the original recipe verbatim (I have a request pending at the Jefferson archives), so I’m relying on editor Damon Lee Fowler’s transcription. He notes that he had help from noted food historian Karen Hess, so no doubt this is a very accurate transcription. I’ve added pepper to the soup according to taste; pepper was widely available at the time, and I don’t think it would be out of place in this type of soup. While the soup was nice with salt alone, the pepper definitely improved the flavor. Otherwise, the recipe remains untouched from Mr. Fowler’s transcription.

Update: I received a scan of the original recipe from the Jefferson archives. Here is the recipe from the Meikelham and Trist Manuscripts, verbatim, for those who are interested. It is indeed quite similar to Fowler’s transcription. Words with question marks were illegible on the scan.

Bean Soup

Put 1 qt. beans in soak at night; the next morning put them into a pot with some salt and 1 gal. cold water; afterwards put in some carrots & turnips * 1 parsnip, the first scraped, the second (& third) peeled, and both cut up in small pieces. Set the pot to one side of the range, skimming it as you do other soups, and let it simmer for 5 or 6 hours. After the vegetables have (become?) soft, pass the whole through the colander & put it back in its pot. About half an hour before the soup is taken off, cut up some stalks of celery and put them in. Fry or toast some thin slices of bread & cut them up in small pieces & put into the tureen in which the soup is to be served; then pour it on the bread. If the bread is fried, cut it up before putting it in the pan. If the soup gets too thick in boiling, add boiling water to it; it may be, you may add in the (?) – the time that it is on the fire, two quarts more or less. The quantity here directed will make soup for two days for a family of an ordinary size.

– Governor Morris the Elder

* The beans ought to be washed and picked before putting them in soak, or using them without soaking, in which (best?) case they take longer to boil. 

* These roots need not be put on directly with the beans, the carrots should be put on first of them, then turnips, then parsnip last.

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Monticello White Bean Soup Main

Monticello White Bean Soup

from 18 votes
Servings
servings
Prep Time
8 hours
Cook Time
2 hours
Kosher Key
Parve or Dairy, depending on preparation
Print Recipe

Description

Learn a colonial recipe from Thomas Jefferson’s family at Monticello for White Bean Soup. Vegetarian, healthy, delicious historical recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lbs dried navy, great Northern, or cannellini beans (4 cups)
  • 16 cups water (4 quarts)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 large carrots, trimmed, peeled, and diced
  • 2 small turnips, trimmed, peeled, and diced
  • 1 medium parsnip, trimmed, peeled, and diced
  • 3 large ribs of celery with leafy green tops, chopped
  • 2-3 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 4 slices rustic artisan bread, sliced 1/2 inch thick

Recipe Notes

You will also need: a large soup pot or 6-quart Dutch oven

Instructions

  1. Rinse and sort the beans, removing any stones or impurities. Drain the beans and put them in a large bowl, then cover by a few inches of cold water. Soak the beans overnight.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-4.jpg

    Dried beans soaking in water.

  2. Drain the beans.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-5.jpg

    Straining beans.

  3. Put the beans in a large pot or 6-quart Dutch oven. Cover with 4 quarts of water and bring slowly to a simmer over medium heat, skimming any scum that rises to the surface. Simmer gently until the beans are tender, about 1 hour. Replenish the liquid with additional water as needed.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-7.jpg

    Skimming foam from cooking beans.

  4. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Add the diced carrots and turnips and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes. Add the parsnip and continue to simmer until all of the vegetables and beans are quite soft, 15-30 minutes longer. Taste the soup and adjust seasoning, adding more salt or pepper to taste, if desired.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-8.jpg

    Diced vegetables added to Dutch oven.

  5. Pass the soup through a food mill to puree, or use an immersion blend to blend the soup till it reaches the desired texture. In Jefferson’s time it would have been passed through a sieve to make a very smooth and light puree, but it is a very time consuming process for a large batch of soup like this. The food mill will create the most authentic texture in a short amount of time. An immersion blender will make the soup thicker, less silky and less refined, with a texture that is not as authentic. It will still be tasty, though.

  6. Add the chopped celery ribs to the puree and simmer gently for 15 minutes more. If the soup is too thick, thin it with more simmering water.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-9.jpg

    Bean soup simmering.

  7. Butter the bread slices and toast them in a skillet on medium heat, turning frequently, until golden. To make the dish pareve or vegan, use a dairy-free bread and rub the bread lightly with olive oil instead of butter before browning.

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-11.jpg

    Toasting bread in a skillet.

  8. Cut the toasted slices into bite-sized pieces and divide them among 8 warm bowls.

  9. Ladle the soup over the toasted bread cubes. Serve hot. I like to garnish each serving with a few small bread cubes on top. Note: to make this soup vegan/dairy free, omit butter and use a dairy-free bread… not necessarily traditional, but an easy sub to make. 🙂

    image: https://toriavey.com/images/2012/02/Monticello-White-Bean-Soup-Main.jpg

    Monticello White Bean Soup Main

Nutrition Facts
Monticello White Bean Soup
Amount Per Serving
Calories 381Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g6%
Saturated Fat 2g10%
Cholesterol 7mg2%
Sodium 147mg6%
Potassium 1252mg36%
Total Carbohydrates 65g22%
Dietary Fiber 23g92%
Sugars 7g
Protein 21g42%
Vitamin A54.1%
Vitamin C13.4%
Calcium18.7%
Iron30.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Recipe and Research Sources

The Meikelham and Trist Manuscripts as printed in Dining at Monticello (2005), transcribed and edited by Damon Lee Fowler. Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Jefferson, Thomas (collective works compiled 1984). Jefferson Writings: Autobiography, Notes on the State of Virginia, Public and Private Papers, Addresses, Letters. Library of America, Des Moines, IA.

Wulf, Andrea (2011). Founding Gardners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation. Knopf, New York, NY.

See the full post:https://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/what-thomas-jefferson-ate-white-bean-soup-2/#abPMHtySy94mtI0F.99

Happy Birthday Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson: President, Scholar, First Foodie

TODAY IS THOMAS JEFFERSON’S birthday, and what might the president, on his special day, have had to eat?

Perhaps chicken fricassee, baked Virginia ham, or bouilli—beef boiled with onion, carrots, turnips, and celery, and topped with a mushroom-and-caper sauce. Any of these may have been accompanied by asparagus or peas, both of which—according to Jefferson’s meticulously kept Garden Book—were often available from the Monticello gardens by early April. And the meal may have been polished off with ice cream, pastry, pudding, or crème brûlée, and followed up with an after-dinner glass of Madeira, which Jefferson believed was good for the health

Whatever was served on the Jeffersonian birthday table, it was almost certainly delicious. Unlike Bill Clinton, whose favorite meals once featured cheeseburgers and Egg McMuffins, or George H.W. Bush, who touted pork rinds, popcorn, and hot dogs, Thomas Jefferson was renowned for his discerning and sophisticated taste in food.

Of his many accomplishments, the three that Thomas Jefferson chose to be engraved on his tombstone were his authorship of the Declaration of Independence and the Virginia Statue for Religious Freedom, and the founding of the University of Virginia. He didn’t mention French fries, champagne, macaroni, waffles, ice cream, olive oil, or Parmesan cheese. In fact, these probably didn’t even make it into his top tombstone ten, but Americans owe him a considerable debt for expanding our diets to include these items. Without Jefferson, we might just possibly still be stuck with cornmeal mush and dried-apple pie.

Though common dogma holds that French cooking arrived in the United States in 1961 when Julia Child’s now-classic, 524-recipe Mastering the Art of French Cooking hit the stands, Thomas Craughwell, author of Thomas Jefferson’s Crème BrûléeThomas Jefferson’s Crème Brûlée, argues that it arrived much earlier, with Thomas Jefferson and his French-trained chef/slave, James Hemings. And, despite Jefferson’s passionate interest in all things food, Hemings gets the hands-on credit here. Jefferson, for all his talents, was no cook. According to his household staff, Jefferson never entered the Monticello kitchen except to wind the clock.

During his five years as American minister to France, Jefferson reveled in French culture. He went to concerts and plays, visited the Louvre, bought furniture, silver, paintings, sculpture, mirrors, and kicky kitchen equipment: He came home with a coffee urn, a pasta machine, a waffle iron, ice-cream molds, and a bowl for cooling wine glasses.

And he certainly enjoyed fine food. He had offered 19-year-old James Hemings his freedom if James would learn French cuisine and pass it on to cooks at Monticello. James seems to have more than lived up to his half of the bargain. He became fluent in French and was soon such a skilled cook that Jefferson’s dinner parties, attended by the best and the brightest in France, were famous for scrumptious dishes.

Despite unsubstantiated culinary legend, Jefferson didn’t invent any of the foods that are associated with his name. Instead, since the public paid avid attention to what was served on the president’s table, he had a bully pulpit for popularizing his favorites. For example, ice cream. While ice cream in one form or another had been around for hundreds of years, Jefferson’s recipe is the first recorded by an American, and it was during his administration that it became an increasingly universal treat. The president seems to have favored it encased in pastry. Guests to the President’s House (now White House) describe “balls of frozen material” in a pastry crust. When Jefferson’s French cook, Honore Julien, left the president’s service in 1810, he opened a confectionary business, offering ice cream to customers on Sundays and Wednesdays. By 1824, when Mary Randolph (a Jefferson relative) published The Virginia House-Wife, she included twenty different recipes for ice cream, including one flavored with oysters.

Similarly, Jefferson was a proponent of the now all-American standard: macaroni and cheese. In fact, he served it at a state dinner in 1802.

Not everybody appreciated Jefferson’s culinary predelictions. Patrick Henry— obviously a cornmeal mush man—excoriated him for abjuring “his native victuals in favor of French cuisine.” According to his granddaughter, Jefferson’s preference for such dishes as bouilli and crème brûlée caused his enemies to accuse him of colluding with Napoleon Bonaparte.

Jefferson, however, had a foot in both food camps. While supporting foreign newbies such as olive oil, champagne, and Parmesan cheese, Jefferson also promoted the best of foods from home. French apples, for example, didn’t meet his standards: announcing that there was nothing in Europe to compare to the Newtown pippin, he begged James Madison to ship him a barrel. In his French garden, he grew American corn. During his years abroad, he missed Virginia hams (“better than any to be had”) in France and he ordered American shipments of pecans and cranberries.

Thomas Jefferson may have been America’s first foodie—the first to embrace today’s acceptance of a vast and fascinating range of cuisines. Today we leap insouciantly from sushi to tacos, lasagna to Yorkshire pudding to paella to boeuf bourguignon—but historically that hasn’t been the case. For many, it was at Thomas Jefferson’s table that people had their first taste of a new food world.

Perhaps even more important, Jeffersonian dinners were known not just for creative food, but for social connections and lively conversation. An often-repeated quote by John F. Kennedy, remarking on a White House dinner of Nobel Prize winners, references “the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House, with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.”

Thomas Jefferson, however, did his best never to dine alone.

 

Chewing Gum Helps Curving Appetite

Does Chewing Gum Suppress Your Appetite?

Most types of gum have relatively few calories per piece, usually 10 or less, so they are a good way for you to get a little sweet fix. Some, but not all, research shows that chewing gum may help you decrease your appetite, at least for a little while. These decreases in appetite, however, won’t necessarily lead to weight loss.

Decreased Appetite and Snacking

Participants in a study published in “Appetite” in October 2011 who chewed gum for 15 minutes each hour after lunch ate 10 percent less than those who didn’t chew gum when offered a snack three hours later. The gum chewing helped limit cravings for both sweet and salty snacks and helped participants feel less hungry.

Conflicting Results

Not all studies have shown decreases in snacking, however. A study published in “Appetite” in May 2007 found that chewing gum for 15 minutes per hour after lunch decreased cravings for sweet snacks, but not for salty ones. Another study, published in the same journal in March 2007, found that participants who chewed gum whenever hungry or who chewed gum two hours after lunch didn’t experience a decrease in appetite or snacking during the rest of the day, compared to participants who didn’t chew gum.

Effect on Weight Loss

Don’t expect to start chewing gum and have your extra pounds melt off. A study published in “Obesity” in March 2012 found that chewing gum for at least 90 minutes a day on a regular schedule for eight weeks didn’t lead to any more weight loss than being given a handout on nutrition. You’ll need to follow the usual recommendations — eat less and exercise more — if you want to lose weight.

Other Considerations

While any type of gum may help increase the amount of saliva in your mouth to help carry off bits of food, stick with sugar-free gum that has the American Dental Association seal, as this type of gum may help lower your risk for cavities the most. Chewing gum after meals is best for limiting cavities, while chewing gum periodically between meals may be more effective for decreasing your appetite.

Most Popular Recipes of 2018

The Most Popular Recipes of 2018

Chicken francese.CreditLinda Xiao for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Monica Pierini.
Image
Chicken francese.CreditCreditLinda Xiao for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Monica Pierini.

Good morning. We mined our data to come up with a list of the 50 most popular new recipes on NYT Cooking this year. I’m super-stoked to report that the top slot went to Julia Moskin’s recipe for chicken francese (above), an American-Italian interpretation of French cooking that you’ll find on restaurant menus all over the United States but particularly in ones built under the low slate skies of Rochester, N.Y., where the dish is known as “chicken French.”

A number-one position for the children of East Avenue, Upper Falls and Swillburg! A Kodak moment for Fairport and Greece, Brighton, Pittsford, Irondequoit! Chicken francese is a fantastic dish, easily made, with deep and abiding flavor that goes nicely alongside plain spaghetti tossed with olive oil and butter, a side of garlicky greens, some bread. Try it. Chicken French for all.

Other top recipes this year included: Alison Roman’s salted chocolate chunk shortbread cookies; Melissa Clark’s sheet-pan chicken with sweet potatoes and peppers; the beef and broccoli I learned to make from the private chef Jonathan Wu and the restaurateur and chef Dale Talde; and Alison’s classic baked macaroni and cheese. Check out the complete list, and get cooking. Collect them all!

You don’t have to cook a recipe tonight, of course. On Wednesdays I encourage you not to use recipes at all, but to engage in an exercise of improvisatory cooking, working off a narrative theme.

 

For instance, bananas Foster. You can look at the recipe a predecessor of mine, Jane Nickerson, brought to The Times in 1957. Or you can riff off the experience I had on Saturday night at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, where a top-tier captain named Samantha La Pointe-Woolf made the dish tableside, and made it the best I’ve ever had.

All you need is a lot of butter, a lot of brown sugar, a couple of bananas, light rum, some banana liqueur if you have any (if you don’t, the rum’s just fine). Everything is ratio: Think about a half stick of unsalted butter for every two bananas, and about as much brown sugar. Melt and swirl the butter and sugar over medium-high heat to create a thick caramel, then add the bananas, peeled and halved, to get a little color on them. Sprinkle with cinnamon, add a half cup of rum and a splash of banana liqueur, then tip the pan slightly so the alcohol goes alight. WHOOSH GOES THE FLAME. Continue swirling until everything dies away, then spoon the caramel over the fruit again and serve with vanilla ice cream.

For instance, bananas Foster. You can look at the recipe a predecessor of mine, Jane Nickerson, brought to The Times in 1957. Or you can riff off the experience I had on Saturday night at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, where a top-tier captain named Samantha La Pointe-Woolf made the dish tableside, and made it the best I’ve ever had.

All you need is a lot of butter, a lot of brown sugar, a couple of bananas, light rum, some banana liqueur if you have any (if you don’t, the rum’s just fine). Everything is ratio: Think about a half stick of unsalted butter for every two bananas, and about as much brown sugar. Melt and swirl the butter and sugar over medium-high heat to create a thick caramel, then add the bananas, peeled and halved, to get a little color on them. Sprinkle with cinnamon, add a half cup of rum and a splash of banana liqueur, then tip the pan slightly so the alcohol goes alight. WHOOSH GOES THE FLAME. Continue swirling until everything dies away, then spoon the caramel over the fruit again and serve with vanilla ice cream.

You can find actual, tested, written and photographed recipes to cook right now on NYT Cooking. Like, for instance, this awesome salty-sour recipe for pork shoulder asado that Priya Krishna learned from Chad and Chase Valencia, brothers who own and run the Filipino restaurant Lasa in Los Angeles.

Of course, you’ll need a subscription to access them. It will support everything we do. (If you want to redouble that sustenance, consider buying a gift subscription for someone else.)

And have you signed up for Emily Weinstein’s newsletter “Five Weeknight Dishes”? That’s free. As are most of the things we post on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

We’ll be standing by to help, should anything go wrong along the way, either with your cooking or our technology. Just ask for help: cookingcare@nytimes.com. We will get back to you.

Now, nothing whatsoever to do with persimmons or Moscow mules, but Baratunde Thurston recently introduced me to Detour, a kind of cool-kid tourism app that leads you on tours around cities across the United States and the world. (It’d be neat, we agreed, to write a fictional one for New York, a satirical guide to the East Village, say.) Bose bought the app a number of months ago to use as an experience for their forthcoming augmented reality platform, so act now.

Here are The Buzzcocks, “Ever Fallen in Love,” an early-days video performance I hadn’t seen before and it’s terrific. (Pete Shelley, the band’s leader, died last week at 63.)

Finally, I like this photo-audio feature in The California Sunday Magazine, a roundup of some Californians’ go-to meals. Check that out, and make bananas Foster for dessert tonight. I’ll be back on Friday.

We’ll be standing by to help, should anything go wrong along the way, either with your cooking or our technology. Just ask for help: cookingcare@nytimes.com. We will get back to you.

Now, nothing whatsoever to do with persimmons or Moscow mules, but Baratunde Thurston recently introduced me to Detour, a kind of cool-kid tourism app that leads you on tours around cities across the United States and the world. (It’d be neat, we agreed, to write a fictional one for New York, a satirical guide to the East Village, say.) Bose bought the app a number of months ago to use as an experience for their forthcoming augmented reality platform, so act now.

Here are The Buzzcocks, “Ever Fallen in Love,” an early-days video performance I hadn’t seen before and it’s terrific. (Pete Shelley, the band’s leader, died last week at 63.)

Finally, I like this photo-audio feature in The California Sunday Magazine, a roundup of some Californians’ go-to meals. Check that out, and make bananas Foster for dessert tonight. I’ll be back on Friday.