Rituals of Tea

Rituals of Tea

Tea has always been a large part of my life. My love of tea was instilled by my Mom and Dad, who created an amalgamation of Indian and English tea time rituals to America.  Tea time was always looked forward too at the house as it allowed me to forget about the stress of living in a new country and remember my roots as an Indian and Englishwoman. To this day I will always make time in the morning and in the evening for a nice warm cup of tea.

Chai – the drink India can’t live without

In India, chai is more than just a cup of tea to start the day – the thick sweet drink is an integral part of the rhythm of life. Zach Marks and Resham Gellatly have been documenting the culture of Indian chai and the people who sell it – known as chai wallahs.

One hand taking tea from another handImage copyrightRESHAM GELLATLY

Tea is India’s most popular drink – the country consumes 837,000 tonnes of it every year. The ritual of drinking chai transcends all boundaries, and roadsides are dotted with chai wallahs who serve it boiled up with spices, sugar and milk.

Straining teaImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Santosh strains a vat of boiling chai at his shop in Mumbai. Since he began selling tea 15 years ago, the area has changed dramatically. Many of the small businesses where Santosh once delivered chai have been replaced by large office buildings which he can’t enter. But many people working in the new developments have become regular customers, preferring Santosh’s chai made with thick milk and fresh ginger to the tea bags available in their offices.

GingerImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

A popular ingredient in north Indian chai, ginger is believed to have numerous health benefits and is thought to keep your body warm in winter. The spicy root has been used in hot, milk-based beverages in India for hundreds of years, so when the British popularised tea in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, adding ginger to the mix was a natural thing to do.

Shobhan BarwaImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Shobhan Barwa’s stand is in the heart of Alipore, a posh neighbourhood in Calcutta. During the annual Hindu festival of Durga Puja, crowds flock here to see the elaborate pandals – temporary structures housing Hindu deities. He usually closes shop by 22:00, but for the week of Durga Puja, he stays open until 05:00 serving chai, eggs and French toast to visitors who need a caffeine kick to keep them going through the night.

BaghbazarImage copyrightRESHAM GELLATLY

On the final day of the festival, thousands join a procession to the Hooghly River where giant statues of Hindu gods and goddesses are immersed in the water. Last year, though, celebration turned to tragedy – a young man drowned when a statue fell on him at Baghbazaar. People gathered at a nearby chai stand to mourn his death.

Kulhars and potsImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Several decades ago, chai was served in small clay pots, known as kulhar in Hindi or bhar in Bengali. While the bowls are still popular in Calcutta, plastic cups, tiny glasses and steel tumblers have become the vessels of choice across most of India.

RukmaniImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Born on a tea estate in Kotagiri in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, Rukmani has been plucking tea leaves all her life. As the eldest member of her group of female workers, she is called Amma, or mother. At lunchtime Amma prepares black chai over a fire of twigs with tea dust provided by a nearby factory.

GaneshImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Ganesh, a chai wallah at the railway station in Patna in Bihar state, brews one of his last pots of the night. Many Indians associate rail travel with the cries of “chai, chai,” from tea sellers carrying kettles along trains and platforms. Ganesh has memorised the local timetable and often gives travellers directions as well as a cup of chai.

Chai stall in VaranasiImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Chai stands are often family businesses spanning many generations. The owner of this tea stall in Varanasi, one of India’s oldest and holiest cities, took over the business when his father passed away and keeps his memory alive by hanging a fresh garland of marigolds every morning.

Varanasi burning ghatImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Lalu Yadav has seen hundreds of thousands of cremations – his chai stand is next to Manikarnika Ghat, a cremation ground by the sacred Ganges river in Varanasi. Many Hindus believe it is an auspicious place to die and the people who come here to wait out their last days ensure the fires of Manikarnika burn bright day and night. Lalu’s father started the tea stand 40 years ago, offering mourning families a place to sit and sip chai during cremations. For him, constant proximity to death has become part of life. “There is no sadness here. We are used to seeing this 24 hours a day. These are only bodies.”

Photographs by Resham Gellatly and Zach Marks – you can see more pictures and read their blog at chaiwallahsofindia.com.

Traveling Light

Traveling Light

My son and I are  currently getting ready to visit  family  in England.  The stressful part of traveling is always “What Do I pack”?  I usually overpack but we can only have 1 suitcase per person, so my son and I will have to pack light.

Read article below for tips for if you plan on  vacationing this summer:

Summer can be a glorious time in England, with warm, sunny days, blue skies and English gardens in full bloom. But don’t count on it — summer can also be chilly, rainy and blustery. If you’re traveling to England during the summer, pack for the varied weather and be ready for anything.

English Weather

England is part of the island of Great Britain, and being surrounded by water helps keep the climate moderate. Summer temperatures average from a low in the mid-50s Fahrenheit to highs in the mid-70s, with an occasional heat wave. The farther north you go or the higher in elevation, the cooler it will be. Summer days are also long, with June sunrise in London as early as 4:30 a.m. and sunset as late as 9:30 p.m. Rain is always a possibility; the Lake District is the wettest region, while mountainous areas are more likely to be cloudy or foggy.

Women’s Clothing

Interchangeable separates in neutral colors are always a good choice, so pack basic black pants and another pair in navy, gray or khaki, as well as jeans for casual wear. Add a couple of casual tops and at least one dressy blouse. A lightweight sweater or fleece top for warmth comes in handy; you can wear either under your waterproof jacket or raincoat, which is an essential item to pack. If your raincoat is hooded, so much the better, as rainy days can also be windy; although a collapsible umbrella can come in handy, it can also be difficult to handle when the wind gusts. A pair of hiking boots you’ve already broken in or a dark pair of athletic shoes will keep you comfy if you’re doing a lot of walking. Add a pair of dressy flats or heels to go with a dress or a skirt that you can pair with your dressy blouse, and you’ll be ready for anything without having to drag a heavy suitcase after you. A scarf, a belt and some jewelry will allow you to change your look without adding bulk to your packing. Throw in a bathing suit — after all, it is summer.

Men’s Clothing

Men also need separates they can mix and match; a couple of pairs of dark slacks with some knit shirts will cover most needs. Jeans are perfectly acceptable for casual wear. Make sure you have at least one long-sleeved knit top to layer under a sweater or fleece top, and be sure to pack that raincoat. A dress shirt will serve for most occasions, but pack a sport coat if you’re going to be dining in fine restaurants — to some extent, the better you’re dressed, the better you’ll be treated. You’re unlikely to need a tie on vacation, but they’re small, so throw one in just in case. Hiking boots or dark athletic shoes will work for everyday use; add a pair of dress shoes, too. Bring your swim trunks, but stick with a shorts style rather than briefs.

Additional Considerations

A major consideration in determining what to wear is what you plan to be doing. Obviously, if you are going to England for a business meeting, you’ll need to bring your suit or other business attire. If you plan to spend time at the seaside, consider a lightweight coverup and some sturdy sandals — some beach areas are rocky, and you want to stay safe. Another good option for rain protection is a hat. If you’re going to stay for more than a few days but want to keep your luggage light, think about lightweight basics you can wash out and let dry overnight. If you know you’re a bit messy and will be eating on the go, a print or plaid shirt may help hide your slips. And, of course, don’t forget underwear, socks, nightwear and sunglasses.

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet!

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet!

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet and Workout Routine

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet

Aishwarya has already stunned everyone with her sensuous, bold, seductress avatar in Karan Johar’s directorial venture ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil.’ And now at Cannes Film Festival 2017, she has proved once again that she is the queen of Bollywood. From flying kisses to elegant poses, she looked every inch a royal princess. She got a very good response after this amazing body transformation. All thanks to Aishwarya Rai weight loss!

There was a time when Aishwarya Rai’s tremendous post pregnancy weight grabbed many eyeballs. She was criticized for her weight gain post baby but she chose to ignore the haters and prioritized her family and child over her looks.

Aishwarya Rai’s message on Motherhood

The Bachchan bahu spoke vastly about motherhood. She said, “I didn’t over think the fact that I had put on weight. I didn’t do anything as expected of someone who came with all the adages as me. There’s a lot of glamour and a lot of visual that is attached to me. But I stayed committed to my reality. If my body did go through this change, so be it. I didn’t play into the stereotype of what is possible. It’s an individual choice if people decide to go under the knife. I had access to that but I chose not to. I was genuinely comfortable in my skin and I got recognition along the way. Women who met me publicly, thanked me for the fact that I was giving them strength to be comfortable with the natural change. Hormonally anything can happen to a woman, your body can go through change and it’s important to remain comfortable and not let it affect you psychologically. My comfort and my conviction to just say true, in turn, gave strength to so many women. Suddenly, it’s okay to put on weight. It’s okay that your body changes physically from health reasons or otherwise and it’s okay to choose to dress the way you want to. I am happy with my weight and I love my daughter.”

Aishwarya Rai With Her Daughter Aaradhya

Now, Aishwarya Rai is back with a bang. After widespread criticism over her baby fat, she has transformed herself. The celebrity mother has lost all the weight she gained during and after pregnancy and is looking fitter than ever. Take a look at her fairytale appearance at Cannes, 2017.

Aishwarya Rai at Cannes 2017

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss

Aishwarya Rai Cannes 2017

 

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan Cannes 2017

 

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan Diet

 

Spellbound! Isn’t she mesmerizing?
But how did she manage to flaunt a slim, graceful figure with no remains of the pregnancy baggage? Let’s check out –

Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss DIET

BREAKFAST

Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss secret is that she never skips her breakfast. She starts her day with warm water, with lemon and honey in it. It is a great way to revive your metabolism.

In breakfast, she takes brown bread toast or a steaming bowl of freshly cooked oats. Oatmeal is considered a healthy whole grain and contains high levels of protein and fiber.

LUNCH

Her lunch normally consists of boiled vegetables which are easy to digest, full of nutrients, contains little or no fat and flavorful. Sometimes she also takes a bowl of dal as well as one chapati. Aishwarya says -“I can survive on dal, chawal and vegetables”.

DINNER

She prefers to eat very light for the dinner and eats a cup of brown rice and grilled fish. Brown rice has high fiber content and is more healthier than white rice. Thus helps in burning more fat and decreases the chances of overeating by satisfying the appetite. Grilled fish provides the required protein and omega 3 fatty acids.

Apart from this, Aishwarya keeps her portion in control and prefers smaller meals throughout the day. She strictly avoids any fatty, junk or fried foods. Instead prefers fruits, vegetables, and fresh juices. She keeps herself hydrated by having 8 glasses of water per day. She tries to maintain a fat-free diet which not only accentuates her figure but also brings a glow to her skin.

ALSO READ: Amazing Diet Secrets Of Shilpa Shetty.

Aishwarya Rai weight loss WORKOUT ROUTINE

Aishwarya is not a regular gym going person and doesn’t follow any workout routine. In one of her interviews, she admitted that she was never serious about the workout and never worked hard to achieve a toned and lean figure. Actually, she never wanted a lean figure and feels happy in her curvaceous body. It seems her figure is all because of her good genes.

But if at any time she feels this need for the perfect body she attends gym twice a week. Aishwarya prefers yoga over workouts. She believes in the method of eating right and practicing yoga. According to her, yoga is the best way to keep the body powerful and so as flexible.

Aishwarya Rai's Weight Loss

  • Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss workout routine starts with brisk walking or jogging in the morning.
  • After this, she devotes 45 minutes to yoga which includes power yoga.
  • Sometimes she also does functional training along with full cardio workouts at home.

 

 

Kim Kardashian And Beauty Line

Photo

Kim Kardashian West at the Forbes Women’s Summit in New York earlier this month. On Wednesday, she will introduce her new cosmetics line, KKW Beauty. CreditAngela Weiss/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

When it comes to beauty influencers, Kim Kardashian West can be credited as a pioneer. With her longtime makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic, she lauded the benefits of contouring (that old-school stage-makeup method of using darker base shades or bronzer to chisel and define features) early on. But unlike her half sister Kylie Jenner, whose Kylie Cosmetics line had its debut two years ago and has enjoyed booming success, Ms. Kardashian held herself apart from the legions of social media tastemakers turned solo makeup entrepreneurs — until now.

On Wednesday, Ms. Kardashian will introduce KKW Beauty with one product: perhaps unsurprisingly, the Crème Contour and Highlight Kit, with a contour stick, a highlighter stick and a brush/sponge, all with dual ends. It will be sold exclusively at KKWBeauty.com in four shades for $48 each.

Though Ms. Kardashian is no stranger to beauty brand extensions — she has her own fragrance line, and she and her sisters licensed their name for Kardashian Beauty and Kardashian Tan — this is the first time she has had full control over all the particulars, including product, packaging and image. Further, she intends the business to become a full-blown line, with several products already in the pipeline.

The rollout has not come off without a hitch, however. Last week, Ms. Kardashian posted a promotional image of herself on Twitter, in a cream-colored bra top and high ponytail, looking very contoured and very, very tan, prompting allegations that she had darkened her skin. Or, to put it more bluntly, that she was essentially wearing blackface.

Photo

Ms. Kardashian will introduce her line with one product, the Crème Contour and Highlight Kit. CreditBen Hasset

But certainly no one is betting against Ms. Kardashian, who has proved adept at capitalizing on controversy in the past. Here, she responds to the blackface Twitter storm and explains how her own beauty evolution is reflected in KKW Beauty.

You’re not the first social media star to start her own line. Why were you slower to the game?

I had a line with my sisters, and we were in a licensing deal and a partnership, and it took time to get out of that. Right after, I said, “Hey guys, I want to do something on my own.” Kylie had just started her lip kits, my mom and Kylie had found a really great business model and found great partners. I learned so much from them.

Does that mean you’re going to work with the same manufacturer as Kylie?

Yes, I’m working with the same manufacturer. I’ve had a relationship with them for a while actually. But the lines, they’re totally separate. We don’t really talk to each other about what we’re doing and what our formulas are.

Mario, your makeup artist, recently signed on with Laura Mercier. With the introduction of your line, will you continue to work together?

Mario and I, we’re like family. We started in this together. We are so close that no matter what, we will always get advice from each other. I literally FaceTimed him at 2 a.m. the other day with a million swatches on my face. I was like, “I can’t decide which swatch and what shade this product should be,” and he told me which was best.

You two have been moving toward a more natural look, with less contour.

Yes, but I’ve always stayed true to contour. I’d say that for the past six months, I haven’t been wearing much makeup, but I try to have a little bit of a bronzy look that’s really beautiful and really creamy-looking. That’s why the sticks are cream. There’s no setting powder. But you can make it a heavier contour by adding a setting powder on top of the cream contour.

Why did you move to a more low-maintenance look?

Having kids really changes it up.

A lot of the social media-driven brands are targeting a younger shopper — more a 20-something millennial — but perhaps the quality of the product isn’t there. Being a mom, and being in your 30s, what’s your focus going to be?

When we get to my concealers, I’ll have anti-aging formulas. That’s really important to me — and, of course, the quality. In the beginning, this line will really be about all the correcting and perfecting tricks I’ve learned. There’s the cream contour. There will also be powder contour and undereye concealer. I’ve always had dark undereye circles from being Armenian. These are the things I feel like I’ve really perfected.

Definitely that’s part of your image. Speaking of image, tell me about your side to the blackface controversy.

I would obviously never want to offend anyone. I used an amazing photographer and a team of people. I was really tan when we shot the images, and it might be that the contrast was off. But I showed the image to many people, to many in the business. No one brought that to our attention. No one mentioned it.

Of course, I have the utmost respect for why people might feel the way they did. But we made the necessary changes to that photo and the rest of the photos. We saw the problem, and we adapted and changed right away. Definitely I have learned from it.

High School Graduation 2017!

High School Graduation 2017!

Our Son graduates today!  Congratulations to you and your fellow classmates and Keep UP The Good Work in your new journey!

Advice for graduating high school seniors: Don’t romanticize college

April 25

 

May 1st is the day that graduating high school seniors who have been accepted to college and who have a choice to make are supposed to commit to a school. For those students who think their life depends on the choice they make, here is some advice from a college admission counselor who has worked for years helping students apply to and choose colleges. He is Brennan Barnard, director of college counseling at the Derryfield School, a private college preparatory day school for grades 6-12 in Manchester, N.H.

 

By Brennan Barnard

We’ve all been there — love at first sight; eyes locking from across the room, that familiar rush of warmth and dizziness, the skies that suddenly seem that much brighter. It is tricky enough when our infatuation leads to unrealistic ideals of perfection in a partner, but it’s downright dangerous when we fall in love with a college this way.  For high school students this idealism is quite common as they develop romanticized expectations of the perfect school.

In my job as a high school college counselor, I see this same dynamic play out every year.  Students have spent considerable energy and emotion on pinning, planning and applying to college.  For some it has been years of allowing college admission to dictate choices and rule the day.  They have gone to great lengths to master tests, stretch themselves academically and exhaust themselves with extracurricular involvement with the goal of impressing admission committees.

After all of this effort, there is an expectation of perfection that simply does not exist.

Choosing a college in not dissimilar to choosing a life partner, and just as no marriage is flawless, the perfect college is but a myth.   Last spring, author Alain de Botton wrote an op-ed for the New York Times about Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person.”  He argued that, “It’s one of the things we are most afraid might happen to us. We go to great lengths to avoid it. And yet we do it all the same: We marry the wrong person.”

This will be my message to high school seniors this year:  No college is perfect and if they start with that premise, they will be less likely to face disappointment.

Botton writes: “The problem is that before marriage, we rarely delve into our complexities. Whenever casual relationships threaten to reveal our flaws, we blame our partners and call it a day.”

I see this increasingly every year from students who are either paralyzed by college choice or who just months in are having buyer’s remorse.   Instead, students must embrace the complexities of college life and opportunity and accept the imperfections.

So what if a student does pick the wrong college? In some ways, it is inevitable, because no school is perfect. Botton contends that in marriage, picking the wrong partner doesn’t mean we need to extricate ourselves. Instead he suggests that we abandon “the founding Romantic idea upon which the Western understanding of marriage has been based the last 250 years: that a perfect being exists who can meet all our needs and satisfy our every yearning.”

Likewise, though it may be “the best four years of your life,” any single college will not meet every need and desire that one has for an education.  This is why internships, study abroad, graduate school and other opportunities exist — to provide outlets for one’s yearning. For other disillusioned college students who are so unhappy, they are transferring — alot.  A 2015 report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center found that more than a third of college students transfer and that nearly half of those do it more than once.

Perhaps a college has most of what a student is looking for academically or socially but the location or food or athletic spirit do not meet expectations.  Instead of embracing the positive and engaging the complexities, however, students focus on the flaws and envision a more perfect ideal that exists only in their mind’s eye.

 The college application process mistakenly sends the message that students should demonstrate perfection in high school achievement and in turn admitted applicants erroneously seek this same flawlessness in a college.  This is an unhealthy start to a partnership.

Instead, seniors faced with the good fortune of college choice should not assume perfection but rather consider each school’s quirks and weaknesses, and ask whether they can accept these over time.  If they practice this now with college, perhaps they will learn important lessons about romanticizing life and relationships.

(Correction: Decision day is May 1st, not April 1st as an earlier version of this said.)

High Tea, Afternoon Tea & Elevenses!

High Tea, Afternoon Tea & Elevenses

High Tea, Afternoon Tea, Elevenses: English Tea Times For Dummies

Afternoon Tea, 1886. Chromolithograph after Kate Greenaway. If you’re looking for finger sandwiches, dainty desserts and formality, afternoon tea is your cup.

Print Collector/Getty Images

You’re an American in London. You’ve visited Buckingham Palace, Big Ben and the Tower of London, but there’s one more thing you want to check off your to-do list: tea.

No, not just any tea. We’re talking a good, old-fashioned English tea time, with finger sandwiches, dainty china cups and all the formality a Downton Abbey lover could wish for.

But wait, you know nothing about taking tea in Britain. Should you raise your pinky while sipping? And, more importantly, what time do the Brits take tea, anyway? Not to worry. The Salt is here to explain British social tea times.

First up is elevenses, which you might have heard of as a hobbit’s third meal of the day. Outside of Middle Earth, this late-morning work break involves a light snack — think muffins, scones or biscuits — and a hot tea or coffee. It occurs, as the name implies, at 11 in the morning.

What about Elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper?

The tradition of elevenses actually isn’t that old, says Bruce Richardson, a historian who specializes in British tea. He speculates that the custom popped up in the 20th century, because there’s no reference to the term in 1800s literature. Even so, elevenses is strongly engrained in today’s British culture — a 2009 article in The Telegraph called it a “vital element of our traditional way of life.”

“People always want to know about that genesis moment: when God said, ‘Let there be tea,’ ” Richardson says. “But the truth is that things came about slowly over time in Britain.”

As we’ve reported, Portugal’s Catherine of Braganza is credited with introducing tea to England after marrying King Charles II in 1662. That got people curious about this new brew, but it wasn’t until the 1800s, when tea prices dropped dramatically and it became affordable for everyone, that the culture of tea really took root.

Afternoon tea — the kind of fancy-schmancy affair where we might spot Lady Mary of Downton Abbey — emerged as a social event sometime around the 1830s or 1840s, Richardson writes in A Social History of Tea. And Anna Maria Russell, duchess of Bedford, led the pack.

Anna Russell, duchess of Bedford. According to the accepted legend, the duchess — and her hunger pangs — created the afternoon tea tradition.

via Wikimedia

Back then, lunch for the upper crust was generally a light repast served at noon, and dinner occurred no earlier than 7:30 p.m. As legend has it, during one long, food-less afternoon, the duchess felt hunger pangs and ordered tea and snacks to her bedroom chamber. The refreshments did the trick, and Russell soon made this tea break a habit.

The duchess’ well-heeled friends began joining her in this post-lunch tea ritual, the story goes, and the practice spread in aristocratic circles. Though some historical references call this ritual “low tea” — because the ladies would sit in low armchairs while sipping — afternoon tea was hardly a humble affair then. Nor is it today.

Here’s where you’ll find those crustless finger sandwiches and an array of dainty scones, cakes, macaroons and other tempting nibbles. Afternoon tea is generally served around 3 or 4 p.m. these days. Richardson says it’s a time to mind your manners. Place your napkin on your lap and stir gently. Splashing tea, clinking cups and spoons and finger licking will make you appear beastly.

And definitely don’t devour everything in front of you. Richardson recalls advice that international etiquette expert (and Liv Tyler’s grandmother) Dorothea Johnson once gave him: You don’t actually want to appear hungry at this meal — propriety calls for restraint.

If you think that’s rough, tea etiquette was stricter back in the day.

“Women could tell a lot about a man by how he handled a tea cup back then,” Richardson says. In the 1800s, he says, “a suitable mate could be easily dropped if you saw him mishandling how he put his spoon on his saucer after he stirred his cup.”

Fortunately, the pressure is off when it comes to high tea.

Despite its name, high tea actually originated with the lower classes. Dinner was served midday in the 1800s, but in practice, working stiffs didn’t have the luxury of an afternoon lunch break, so they took tea right after work with heartier fare — like pies, meats and cheeses — to sate their hunger.

Richardson says the name high tea probably evolved from the fact that this evening meal was served at proper dinner tables, rather than on couches or settees. Using the term “high tea” when you really mean “afternoon tea” is a dead giveaway you’re American.

“The Ritz-Carlton staff in London always can tell it’s an American when they call for high tea at 2 in the afternoon,” Richardson says.

Five O’Clock Tea, by the American painter Mary Cassatt: Pinkies down, ladies!

Mary Cassatt/via Wikimedia

But no matter what you request, Richardson stresses, “Keep those pinkies down!”

“Americans in the Ritz’s tea room stand out because they work so hard to keep their pinkies extended while holding their teacup,” he says while laughing. “It makes you look pretentious.”

Despite all these rules, don’t get too hung up on proper behavior and not making a fool of yourself. British tea time is meant to be relaxing.

Richardson explains, “If you pay attention to your manners, put the napkin in your lap and keep your feet off the table, you’ll probably be OK.”

Tea Add Milk

Tea Tuesdays is an occasional series exploring the science, history, culture and economics of this ancient brewed beverage.

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