Benefits Of Spinning!

Benefits Of Spinning!

 

The article below holds true, as spinning has many benefits.   Sunny and his wife Arosha have been attending spin class at their local gym and have had positive benefits such as relieving stress and no injury.  Yeah! Sunny and Arosha keep up the good work!

The Benefits of a Spinning Workout

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A spinning workout is an excellent way to burn some calories and relieve stress. The workout employs a stationary bike, which has various tension levels. The bike will also track your progress, so that you are motivated to continue and accomplish your fitness goals. There are numerous benefits to a spinning workout.

Burn Calories

A spinning workout of 45 minutes may allow you to burn around 500 calories, which is a huge amount when compared to other types of workout. However, the amount of calories you burn will depend on the intensity of the workout. Adjust your bike according to the intensity you desire.

Build Muscle Tone

The spinning workout may help you build some muscle tone. The workout will focus on the core muscles, as well as the buttocks and thighs. You can increase and decrease the tension of the bike; this is similar to riding up and down a hill. While you pedal, you will work your thighs and calves. If you maintain the correct positionon the bike, you will also work on your abdominal muscles. When you pedal faster, you are likely to burn fat. When you pedal slower and have a higher tension, you will work your muscles.

Increased Cardio Endurance

If you opt for regular spinning classes, you will build increased cardio endurance. This is beneficial, especially if you feel weaker and start panting even after an insignificant effort, such as climbing a flight of stairs.

Low Impact Exercise

A spinning workout is a low impact exercise. This means that it won’t put pressure on knees and joints, as other aerobic or running exercises do. The workout is also recommended for people that suffer from arthritis.

Relieve Stress

Any type of exercise is known to relieve stress. However, a spinning class can be a more efficient stress reliever than most types of exercise. This is due to the fact that the workout is intensive and it is a class where you can meet people and socialize.

Spinning classes are held by an instructor that will motivate you throughout the workout. In addition, there will be music, which will make the class more entertaining.

Reduced Risks of Injury

While running and jogging may present a high risk of injury, a spinning class is less likely to cause any injuries. However, it’s recommended to stretch prior to the class, so that you don’t pull any muscles.

Adjustable Tempo

The stationary bike will have adjustable tensions, which you can change during the class. Your trainer can indicate when to change the tension, or you can adjust it according to your abilities and fitness goals.

Track Your Progress

Most stationary bikes will have some devices which will track the amount of calories you burn, your mileage and even your pulse. This means that you can track your progress, which is also a motivating factor.

Can Be Done Year Round

Unlike other types of activities such as jogging, which can be unpleasant when performed during the months with extreme temperatures, a spinning class can be performed at any time during the year.

 

 

Jeans Conquered the World!

How jeans conquered the world

James Dean, Marilyn Monroe and Marlon Brando (images from Rex Features and Magnum Photos)

It’s difficult to find a garment as widely embraced, worn and loved the world over as jeans. The classic symbol of the American West is now a staple in wardrobes around the world. But why?

Cowboys may wear them but so do supermodels, farmers, presidents and housewives.

Ask any group of people why they wear jeans and you will get a range of answers. For some they’re comfortable, durable and easy – for others they’re sexy and cool. Jeans mean different things to different people. Does this explain their wide appeal?

It is a subject that is relatively unstudied, says anthropologist Danny Miller, whose book Blue Jeans will be published next month.

In every country he has visited – from the Philippines to Turkey, India and Brazil – Miller has stopped and counted the first 100 people to walk by, and in each he found that almost half the population wore jeans on any given day.

Jeans are everywhere, he says, with the exception of rural tracts of China and South Asia.

The reason for their success has as much to do with their cultural meaning as their physical construction.

They were first designed as workwear for labourers on the farms and mines of America’s Western states in the late 19th Century.

When a Nevada tailor called Jacob Davis was asked to make a pair of sturdy trousers for a local woodcutter, he struck upon the idea of reinforcing them with rivets. They proved extremely durable and were soon in high demand.

Davis realised the potential of his product but couldn’t afford to patent it. He wrote to his fabric supplier, the San Francisco merchant, Levi Strauss, for help.

Old Levi's jeans
Image captionThe world’s oldest surviving pair of jeans dates from around 1879

“The secratt of them Pents is the Rivits that I put in those Pockots,” he said. “I cannot make them up fast enough…My nabors are getting yealouse of these success.”

Levi’s, as the patented trousers became known, were made in two fabrics, cotton duck (similar to canvas) and denim.

“They found really early on that it was the denim version that would sell,” says Paul Trynka, author of Denim: From Cowboys to Catwalks. Denim was more comfortable, softening with age, and its indigo dye gave it a unique character.

Indigo doesn’t penetrate the cotton yarn like other dyes but sits on the outside of each thread. These molecules chip off over time, causing the fabric to fade and wear in a unique way.

“Why did it sell?” asks Trynka. “Because the denim changed as it aged and the way it wore reflected people’s lives.”

Because of its fading quality, denim was sold raw – unwashed and untreated – and by the beginning of the 20th Century workers began to realise they could shrink the trousers to a more comfortable fit.

Not only were they more durable but each pair of jeans began to tell the story of the worker and his work.

“Jeans are the most personal thing you can wear,” says Miller. “They wear to the body.”

But the initial explosion of denim into the world of casualwear had more to do with what jeans had come to symbolise.

Before World War II jeans were only worn in America’s Western states. In the east they were synonymous with romantic notions of the cowboy – rugged, independent and American, but at the same time rural and working class.

Affluent easterners would escape humdrum suburban life to holiday on “dude ranches” – working farms where they could play at being cowboys – and wearing jeans was part of the experience.

“It was the kind of clothing that represented the American West and it was this cachet and this sort of magical thing,” says Lynn Downey, archivist and historian at Levi Strauss & Co. But back in Connecticut or New York, the jeans stayed in the closet.

When they did start to be worn as casual wear, it was a startling symbol of rebellion – the spirit captured by Marlon Brando in his 1953 film The Wild One and by James Dean two years later in Rebel Without a Cause.

“If you were a 15-year-old boy in 1953 you wanted to be Marlon Brando,” says Downey.

“Hollywood costume designers put all the bad boys in denim.”

An ad for Lee jeans circa 1942
Image captionLevi’s rivet patent expired in 1908 and other brands entered the market

Dean and Brando wore denim off-screen too. Both represented a subversive counter-culture – a group of young GIs just returned from war, who rode around the US on motorcycles instead of moving to the suburbs and having children.

“They freaked out the establishment in the United States because they were not conforming and they were wearing jeans,” says Downey.

They were soon banned in schools from coast to coast which only added to the fervour with which teenagers embraced them.

Outside America the trend was beginning to catch on too. Many of the GIs stationed in Europe and Japan during the war were working-class boys from the Western states. While off duty they wore their jeans proudly as a symbol of home.

The trousers represented an easier, happier American way of life, which Europeans wanted to buy into.

During the 1960s jeans had also spread to the American middle class. Protesting college students began wearing them as a token of solidarity with the working class – those most affected by racial discrimination and the war draft.

But jeans weren’t only a symbol of democratisation, they put different classes on a level playing field. They were affordable and hard-wearing, looked good worn as well as new, and didn’t have to be washed often or ironed at all. They conformed to the body in a way that matched even the most finely tailored clothes. This became especially important for women because then, as now, they paid more attention to fit.

This versatility, the ability to become all things to all people, is the secret to jeans’ survival as a clothing staple.

In the decades after World War II, every youth subculture – from rockabillies with their wide turn-ups, hippies with bell-bottoms and punks with orchestrated rips and tears – have put their stamp on jeans.

“It was an individualist uniform – which is an oxymoron – but that still does function today,” says Paul Trynka. “Jeans still have a badge of individuality even if you buy them off the rack.”

Today, jeans are mostly sold pre-shrunk and pre-worn. In his book, Miller argues they have become so mainstream that they are now a symbol of the ordinary, a garment people put on to feel comfortable and fit in.

“Jeans have become this neutral foundational garment. If you want to show you are relaxed, if you want to be relaxed, you wear jeans,” says Miller.

But Trynka believes there is still something in their symbol of youth, their ease and casualness, that puts jeans beyond the reach of certain people.

“Famously, George W Bush and Tony Blair went out on the street in denim during their first summit meeting. The statement was, ‘We are regular guys,’ but of course they both looked like dorks,” he says.

Jeans purists were offended by their pristine appearance. Many of them avoid washing their jeans for as long as possible – and it seems that the fabric may have some as yet unexplained capacity to stay clean.

Last year a microbiology student at the University of Alberta, Josh Le, wore the same pair of raw denim jeans for 15 months without washing them and then tested their bacterial content.

He tested them again two weeks after washing them and found the bacterial content to be much the same .

“This shows that, in this case at least, the bacteria growth is no higher if the jeans aren’t washed regularly,” said Rachel McQueen, a professor of textile science, who worked with Le on the informal scientific experiment.

But while different people wear jeans in different ways, the most traditional styles remain among the most popular.

“They’re simple, they’re not complicated,” says Downey of the original Levi’s 501 jean. “It’s just denim, thread and rivets.”

But unadorned denim is still special, says Trynka.

“It’s not just a three-dimensional material, it’s four-dimensional because it changes with time as well. The eternal appeal of jeans is just that they reflect us and they reflect the lives that we’ve had in them.”

Danny Miller spoke to The Forum from the BBC World Service. Listen to the programme here.

Stress And Buying A House

Stress And Buying A House

My husband and I are currently in the market of buying a new house and is stressful but fun. The fun comes from finding the perfect home while the stress is finding the perfect home, that has everything we need. However, having a realtor has significantly dropped  the amount of stress.

How buying a house is more stressful than bankruptcy, divorce and even the death of a loved-one, according to poll

  • Fears the deal could collapse and slow lawyers ranked worst stresses
  • Selling a property seen as more stressful than buying one, survey finds
  • But half of those polled said they had a stressful experience while buying

With prices rocketing, jitters about interest rates, and fears of an imminent collapse, there really has never been a more nail-biting time to dabble in the housing market.

So it’s perhaps no surprise that a new poll shows that buying a house is more stressful than bankruptcy, divorce or even bereavement.

The survey found that a large percentage of adults said getting involved with the property market is one of modern life’s most unpleasant experiences.

People look at properties advertised in an estate agent's window in London: Buying a house is more stressful than bankruptcy, divorce or even bereavement, making it one of life's most unpleasant experiences, a poll says

People look at properties advertised in an estate agent’s window in London: Buying a house is more stressful than bankruptcy, divorce or even bereavement, making it one of life’s most unpleasant experiences, a poll says

Dealing with solicitors and paperwork for weeks on end, fears the deal could collapse at any moment and constantly chasing estate agents for updates was ranked as more traumatic than getting sacked.

In the list of the most stressful lifetime events, the research found the stress of selling a house came above the levels experienced when losing a job, becoming a parent or planning a wedding.

Solicitors bore the brunt of the discontent among those who took part in the study. They were labelled as the most stressful people to work with, while over a quarter had bad experiences with an estate agent.

The research also found people were more than twice as likely to feel selling a property was more stressful than buying one due to having to keep the house clean for constant viewings.

Prospective buyers cancelled viewings on a third of those trying to sell, while 42 per cent received derisory offers.

Over a quarter suffered from a lack of updates from the high street estate agents in the major bug-bears for those trying to sell their home.

Trying to get hold of solicitors in office hours also emerged as a major pain.

For sale: Estate agents came off really badly - in fact when it comes to selling their home to potential buyers four in ten thought they could do a better job than an estate agent

For sale: Estate agents came off really badly – in fact when it comes to selling their home to potential buyers four in ten thought they could do a better job than an estate agent

A weary one in seven had seen a property move collapse because of a poor estate agent and the same number had pulled out of a deal because of their rising frustration levels.

And exactly half of those polled said they had a negative experience when buying a home.

The same number were convinced their property transaction would have been smoother if those involved (lawyers, lenders, estate agents) had communicated more efficiently.

THE 10 MOST STRESSFUL EXPERIENCES IN MODERN LIFE

1. Buying or selling a property

2. Relationship break-up/divorce

3. Being made redundant

4. Death of a grandparent

5. Getting the sack

6. Being in debt

7. Starting a new job

8. Becoming a parent for the first time

9. Planning a wedding

10. Going broke / bankrupt

THE 10 MOST STRESSFUL ASPECTS OF SELLING A PROPERTY

1. Slow solicitors

2. The risk of it falling through

3. The huge sums of money at stake

4. All the documentation to complete

5. Endless phone calls

6. The survey

7. Difficult vendors

8. Difficult estate agents

9. Being gazumped at the last minute

10. Disruption caused to your working day

A disgruntled 45 per cent thought their solicitor or conveyancer dragged their heels and seven in ten were hit with lengthy delays and unexpected frustrations in their last property transaction

Estate agents came off really badly – in fact when it comes to selling their home to potential buyers four in ten thought they could do a better job than an estate agent.

A spokesman for EstatesDirect.com, which commissioned the research, said: ‘The results show just how gruelling the process is regarded and clearly it’s viewed among the most stressful events we encounter in modern life.’

 

Miserable Husband/Wife Is Bad For Health

Miserable Husband/Wife Is Bad For Health

How having a miserable husband (or wife) is bad for your health

  • Study shown having a happy spouse increases chances of good health

  • Dr Chopik, of Michigan State Uni, tracked the health of 2,000 couples

  • Someone who is upbeat is also more likely to eat regularly and sleep well 

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A miserable wife or gloomy husband won’t just get you down – they could also make you ill.

A study has shown that having a happy spouse increases a person’s own chances of good health.

On the flip side, a glum partner could make you unwell.

A miserable wife or gloomy husband won't just get you down – they could also make you ill (File photo)

 

A miserable wife or gloomy husband won’t just get you down – they could also make you ill (File photo)

Researcher Bill Chopik said: ‘Even if you’re the happiest person, your health can be dragged down by an unhappy spouse.’

Dr Chopik, of Michigan State University, tracked the health and happiness of almost 2,000 couples for six years.

The men and women, who were aged 50-plus, were asked how satisfied they were with their lives, as well as whether they suffered from diabetes or any other chronic diseases, how easy they found washing, dressing and other day to day tasks and how much they exercised.

Analysis showed that a partner’s happiness affected their other half’s health.

So, if a husband or wife was a cheerful sort, their spouse tended to be in better health – even if they were not particularly happy themselves.

Similarly, having a miserable spouse seemed to harm a partner’s health.

Dr Chopik said: ‘Participants with happy partners were significantly more likely to report better health, experience less physical impairment and exercise more frequently than participants with unhappy partners, even when accounting for the impact of their own happiness and other life circumstances.

‘None of these effects diminished over time suggesting that having a happy partner could afford surprisingly long-lasting effects on a person’s own health.’

Various studies have shown that happiness boosts a person’s own health but this research, published in the journal Health Psychology, takes the idea a step further by showing that one person’s happiness has a knock-on effect on another’ s health.

A study has shown that having a happy spouse increases a person's own chances of good health (File photo)

A study has shown that having a happy spouse increases a person’s own chances of good health (File photo)

Possible reasons for the finding include a happy spouse being more attentive of their other half. They may also have the energy needed to motivate unhappy spouses to take better care of themselves.

Someone who is upbeat is also more likely to eat regularly and sleep well – healthy behaviours that could rub off on their husband or wife.

In contrast, a miserable atmosphere at home may up the odds of someone drinking or smoking, even if they are relatively happy themselves.

Dr Chopik said: ‘For better and for worse, daily life inevitably involves the presence of other people and happiness simply cannot exist in a vacuum.

‘Testing an older adult population affords insights for better understanding health trajectories in later years of life, when the average person’s health is particularly at risk.

‘Identifying novel factors that may enhance health at these stages is particularly valuable.

‘The presence of one person’s sickness may be subtly indicated by the absent smile of another.’ 

 

Rituals of Tea

Rituals of Tea

Tea has always been a large part of my life. My love of tea was instilled by my Mom and Dad, who created an amalgamation of Indian and English tea time rituals to America.  Tea time was always looked forward too at the house as it allowed me to forget about the stress of living in a new country and remember my roots as an Indian and Englishwoman. To this day I will always make time in the morning and in the evening for a nice warm cup of tea.

Chai – the drink India can’t live without

In India, chai is more than just a cup of tea to start the day – the thick sweet drink is an integral part of the rhythm of life. Zach Marks and Resham Gellatly have been documenting the culture of Indian chai and the people who sell it – known as chai wallahs.

One hand taking tea from another handImage copyrightRESHAM GELLATLY

Tea is India’s most popular drink – the country consumes 837,000 tonnes of it every year. The ritual of drinking chai transcends all boundaries, and roadsides are dotted with chai wallahs who serve it boiled up with spices, sugar and milk.

Straining teaImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Santosh strains a vat of boiling chai at his shop in Mumbai. Since he began selling tea 15 years ago, the area has changed dramatically. Many of the small businesses where Santosh once delivered chai have been replaced by large office buildings which he can’t enter. But many people working in the new developments have become regular customers, preferring Santosh’s chai made with thick milk and fresh ginger to the tea bags available in their offices.

GingerImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

A popular ingredient in north Indian chai, ginger is believed to have numerous health benefits and is thought to keep your body warm in winter. The spicy root has been used in hot, milk-based beverages in India for hundreds of years, so when the British popularised tea in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, adding ginger to the mix was a natural thing to do.

Shobhan BarwaImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Shobhan Barwa’s stand is in the heart of Alipore, a posh neighbourhood in Calcutta. During the annual Hindu festival of Durga Puja, crowds flock here to see the elaborate pandals – temporary structures housing Hindu deities. He usually closes shop by 22:00, but for the week of Durga Puja, he stays open until 05:00 serving chai, eggs and French toast to visitors who need a caffeine kick to keep them going through the night.

BaghbazarImage copyrightRESHAM GELLATLY

On the final day of the festival, thousands join a procession to the Hooghly River where giant statues of Hindu gods and goddesses are immersed in the water. Last year, though, celebration turned to tragedy – a young man drowned when a statue fell on him at Baghbazaar. People gathered at a nearby chai stand to mourn his death.

Kulhars and potsImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Several decades ago, chai was served in small clay pots, known as kulhar in Hindi or bhar in Bengali. While the bowls are still popular in Calcutta, plastic cups, tiny glasses and steel tumblers have become the vessels of choice across most of India.

RukmaniImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Born on a tea estate in Kotagiri in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, Rukmani has been plucking tea leaves all her life. As the eldest member of her group of female workers, she is called Amma, or mother. At lunchtime Amma prepares black chai over a fire of twigs with tea dust provided by a nearby factory.

GaneshImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Ganesh, a chai wallah at the railway station in Patna in Bihar state, brews one of his last pots of the night. Many Indians associate rail travel with the cries of “chai, chai,” from tea sellers carrying kettles along trains and platforms. Ganesh has memorised the local timetable and often gives travellers directions as well as a cup of chai.

Chai stall in VaranasiImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Chai stands are often family businesses spanning many generations. The owner of this tea stall in Varanasi, one of India’s oldest and holiest cities, took over the business when his father passed away and keeps his memory alive by hanging a fresh garland of marigolds every morning.

Varanasi burning ghatImage copyrightZACH MARKS AND RESHAM GELLATLY

Lalu Yadav has seen hundreds of thousands of cremations – his chai stand is next to Manikarnika Ghat, a cremation ground by the sacred Ganges river in Varanasi. Many Hindus believe it is an auspicious place to die and the people who come here to wait out their last days ensure the fires of Manikarnika burn bright day and night. Lalu’s father started the tea stand 40 years ago, offering mourning families a place to sit and sip chai during cremations. For him, constant proximity to death has become part of life. “There is no sadness here. We are used to seeing this 24 hours a day. These are only bodies.”

Photographs by Resham Gellatly and Zach Marks – you can see more pictures and read their blog at chaiwallahsofindia.com.

Traveling Light

Traveling Light

My son and I are  currently getting ready to visit  family  in England.  The stressful part of traveling is always “What Do I pack”?  I usually overpack but we can only have 1 suitcase per person, so my son and I will have to pack light.

Read article below for tips for if you plan on  vacationing this summer:

Summer can be a glorious time in England, with warm, sunny days, blue skies and English gardens in full bloom. But don’t count on it — summer can also be chilly, rainy and blustery. If you’re traveling to England during the summer, pack for the varied weather and be ready for anything.

English Weather

England is part of the island of Great Britain, and being surrounded by water helps keep the climate moderate. Summer temperatures average from a low in the mid-50s Fahrenheit to highs in the mid-70s, with an occasional heat wave. The farther north you go or the higher in elevation, the cooler it will be. Summer days are also long, with June sunrise in London as early as 4:30 a.m. and sunset as late as 9:30 p.m. Rain is always a possibility; the Lake District is the wettest region, while mountainous areas are more likely to be cloudy or foggy.

Women’s Clothing

Interchangeable separates in neutral colors are always a good choice, so pack basic black pants and another pair in navy, gray or khaki, as well as jeans for casual wear. Add a couple of casual tops and at least one dressy blouse. A lightweight sweater or fleece top for warmth comes in handy; you can wear either under your waterproof jacket or raincoat, which is an essential item to pack. If your raincoat is hooded, so much the better, as rainy days can also be windy; although a collapsible umbrella can come in handy, it can also be difficult to handle when the wind gusts. A pair of hiking boots you’ve already broken in or a dark pair of athletic shoes will keep you comfy if you’re doing a lot of walking. Add a pair of dressy flats or heels to go with a dress or a skirt that you can pair with your dressy blouse, and you’ll be ready for anything without having to drag a heavy suitcase after you. A scarf, a belt and some jewelry will allow you to change your look without adding bulk to your packing. Throw in a bathing suit — after all, it is summer.

Men’s Clothing

Men also need separates they can mix and match; a couple of pairs of dark slacks with some knit shirts will cover most needs. Jeans are perfectly acceptable for casual wear. Make sure you have at least one long-sleeved knit top to layer under a sweater or fleece top, and be sure to pack that raincoat. A dress shirt will serve for most occasions, but pack a sport coat if you’re going to be dining in fine restaurants — to some extent, the better you’re dressed, the better you’ll be treated. You’re unlikely to need a tie on vacation, but they’re small, so throw one in just in case. Hiking boots or dark athletic shoes will work for everyday use; add a pair of dress shoes, too. Bring your swim trunks, but stick with a shorts style rather than briefs.

Additional Considerations

A major consideration in determining what to wear is what you plan to be doing. Obviously, if you are going to England for a business meeting, you’ll need to bring your suit or other business attire. If you plan to spend time at the seaside, consider a lightweight coverup and some sturdy sandals — some beach areas are rocky, and you want to stay safe. Another good option for rain protection is a hat. If you’re going to stay for more than a few days but want to keep your luggage light, think about lightweight basics you can wash out and let dry overnight. If you know you’re a bit messy and will be eating on the go, a print or plaid shirt may help hide your slips. And, of course, don’t forget underwear, socks, nightwear and sunglasses.

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet!

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet!

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet and Workout Routine

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss Diet

Aishwarya has already stunned everyone with her sensuous, bold, seductress avatar in Karan Johar’s directorial venture ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil.’ And now at Cannes Film Festival 2017, she has proved once again that she is the queen of Bollywood. From flying kisses to elegant poses, she looked every inch a royal princess. She got a very good response after this amazing body transformation. All thanks to Aishwarya Rai weight loss!

There was a time when Aishwarya Rai’s tremendous post pregnancy weight grabbed many eyeballs. She was criticized for her weight gain post baby but she chose to ignore the haters and prioritized her family and child over her looks.

Aishwarya Rai’s message on Motherhood

The Bachchan bahu spoke vastly about motherhood. She said, “I didn’t over think the fact that I had put on weight. I didn’t do anything as expected of someone who came with all the adages as me. There’s a lot of glamour and a lot of visual that is attached to me. But I stayed committed to my reality. If my body did go through this change, so be it. I didn’t play into the stereotype of what is possible. It’s an individual choice if people decide to go under the knife. I had access to that but I chose not to. I was genuinely comfortable in my skin and I got recognition along the way. Women who met me publicly, thanked me for the fact that I was giving them strength to be comfortable with the natural change. Hormonally anything can happen to a woman, your body can go through change and it’s important to remain comfortable and not let it affect you psychologically. My comfort and my conviction to just say true, in turn, gave strength to so many women. Suddenly, it’s okay to put on weight. It’s okay that your body changes physically from health reasons or otherwise and it’s okay to choose to dress the way you want to. I am happy with my weight and I love my daughter.”

Aishwarya Rai With Her Daughter Aaradhya

Now, Aishwarya Rai is back with a bang. After widespread criticism over her baby fat, she has transformed herself. The celebrity mother has lost all the weight she gained during and after pregnancy and is looking fitter than ever. Take a look at her fairytale appearance at Cannes, 2017.

Aishwarya Rai at Cannes 2017

Aishwarya Rai Weight Loss

Aishwarya Rai Cannes 2017

 

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan Cannes 2017

 

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan Diet

 

Spellbound! Isn’t she mesmerizing?
But how did she manage to flaunt a slim, graceful figure with no remains of the pregnancy baggage? Let’s check out –

Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss DIET

BREAKFAST

Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss secret is that she never skips her breakfast. She starts her day with warm water, with lemon and honey in it. It is a great way to revive your metabolism.

In breakfast, she takes brown bread toast or a steaming bowl of freshly cooked oats. Oatmeal is considered a healthy whole grain and contains high levels of protein and fiber.

LUNCH

Her lunch normally consists of boiled vegetables which are easy to digest, full of nutrients, contains little or no fat and flavorful. Sometimes she also takes a bowl of dal as well as one chapati. Aishwarya says -“I can survive on dal, chawal and vegetables”.

DINNER

She prefers to eat very light for the dinner and eats a cup of brown rice and grilled fish. Brown rice has high fiber content and is more healthier than white rice. Thus helps in burning more fat and decreases the chances of overeating by satisfying the appetite. Grilled fish provides the required protein and omega 3 fatty acids.

Apart from this, Aishwarya keeps her portion in control and prefers smaller meals throughout the day. She strictly avoids any fatty, junk or fried foods. Instead prefers fruits, vegetables, and fresh juices. She keeps herself hydrated by having 8 glasses of water per day. She tries to maintain a fat-free diet which not only accentuates her figure but also brings a glow to her skin.

ALSO READ: Amazing Diet Secrets Of Shilpa Shetty.

Aishwarya Rai weight loss WORKOUT ROUTINE

Aishwarya is not a regular gym going person and doesn’t follow any workout routine. In one of her interviews, she admitted that she was never serious about the workout and never worked hard to achieve a toned and lean figure. Actually, she never wanted a lean figure and feels happy in her curvaceous body. It seems her figure is all because of her good genes.

But if at any time she feels this need for the perfect body she attends gym twice a week. Aishwarya prefers yoga over workouts. She believes in the method of eating right and practicing yoga. According to her, yoga is the best way to keep the body powerful and so as flexible.

Aishwarya Rai's Weight Loss

  • Aishwarya Rai’s weight loss workout routine starts with brisk walking or jogging in the morning.
  • After this, she devotes 45 minutes to yoga which includes power yoga.
  • Sometimes she also does functional training along with full cardio workouts at home.

 

 

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